Chimerical, Stygian Blue, and Hyperbolic the Existence of Impossible Colors

The graphic below is an impossible colors test

chimerical color theory: The image is on a 30 second animated delay which seems the best to view the chimera gif

Define Chimerical, Stygian Blue, Hyperbolic, What are these impossible colors? These forbidden colors have no basis in reality. Here is a little color theory tutorial.

The human eye can produce a phenomenon that has fatigued cone cells into enabling colors to be perceived in certain circumstances that would not be otherwise.

The chimerical definition is one that the colors don’t appear within the color space of human vision. 

As the name suggests they are a construct of the mind. They can be created by inducing a natural process of the eye called color fatigue. If you stare at a color for a long time your eye will temporarily displace the colorspace by the opposing color. The reason the human eye can’t perceive these colors is that signals from the rods (light-dark) and cones (red, green, blue) interpret signals in an antagonistic manner termed the opponent process. So if you stare at yellow, then black, for a short time you will perceive that black to contain blue. The color you are seeing is out of the range of visible colors. It is a pitch black blue; thus it is deemed an impossible color. Above are some examples of chimerical colors to feast your eyes upon. Continue to stare (without shifting your eyes) at one of the many crosses as the image changes.

When the image changes, the impossible colors should be revealed. Some people will see the colors more easily than others. The above image is on a 30-second delay which seems the best to view the chimera. The brightness of the device you are using to view the images will make a huge difference to the effectiveness, and also the effect will vary from person to person. The intensity of the effect increases with longer viewing durations. Chimerical colors don’t appear within the color space of human vision. They are a construct of the mind. They can be created by inducing a natural process of the eye called color fatigue. If you stare at a color for a long time your eye will temporarily displace the color space by the opposing color. So if you stare at yellow, then black, for a short time you will perceive that black to contain blue. The color you are seeing is out of the range of visible colors.
Chimerical colors include:

The stygian definition: these are simultaneously dark and impossibly saturated. 

For example, to see “stygian blue”: staring at bright yellow causes a dark blue afterimage, then on looking at black, the blue is seen as blue against the black, but due to lack of the usual brightness contrast it seems to be as dark as the black. The eye retina contains some neurons that fire only in the dark. The figure below figure also shows how normal after-image colors are produced. (The “f/p” in this figure stands for fatigue/potentiation.) Look at the “Acquired f/p vectors” which show that when a particular color is stared at for a long time, the opponent cells become fatigued and tend towards the middle of the cube (towards the 50%, 50%, 50% point). Then when the eye glances away to a different color background, that vector starts at the new color and points to the after-image color (see the “Re-situated f/p vector”). This example shows that the after-image color for red is green. Churchland goes on to explain that this theory can predict that it is possible to create several after-image colors that would be impossible to see on real objects. 

The following diagram shows how to create a blue after-image color that is darker than black (Stygian Blue)
stygian blue color theory: The following diagram shows how to create a blue after-image color that is darker than black (Stygian Blue)
Self-luminous colors: 

these mimic the effect of glowing material, even when viewed on a medium such as paper, which can only reflect and not emit its light. For example, to see “self-luminous red”: staring at green causes a red afterimage, then on looking at white, the red is seen against the white and may seem to be brighter than the white.

Hyperbolic colors: These are impossibly highly saturated for example, to see hyperbolic orange : 

Staring at bright cyan causes an orange afterimage, then on looking at orange, the resulting orange afterimage seen against the orange background may cause an orange color purer than the purest orange color that can be made by any normally-seen light. Or, staring at something pure magenta in bright sunlight for two minutes or more, and then looking at green leaves, may result in briefly seeing an abnormally pure green afterimage.

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The graphic below is an impossible colors test

Hyperbolic color theory: The image is on a 30 second delay which seems the best to view the chimera gif
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What’s the deal with purple?

You may have heard that purple is not a “real” color. While violets are spectral colors, meaning there is a single wavelength of light for various hues of “violet”, “purple” is a combination of blue and red. Your brain interprets it as “purple.”

What resolution is the human eye? According to scientist and photographer Dr. Roger Clark, the resolution of the human eye is 576 megapixels.

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Tools and resources for purchase: 

Remarks on Colour by Wittgenstein, Ludwig (1991) Paperback Paperback – January 1, 1600
pantone color chart
color spectrometer
pantone capsure
Theory of Colours (The MIT Press) Paperback – March 15, 1970 by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

sources: color theory class Leonard Stokes, Wittgenstein on color, Goethe on color, goethe color theoryZachary Bosfrank, Heile, Wikipedia, Lindsay Kolowich, heDevilBehindTheLeaves,  Aaron. 

#Wittgenstein #Goethe #ZacharyBosfrank #Heile #Wikipedia #LindsayKolowich  #heDevilBehindTheLeaves #Aaron. #colortheory #color #stygian #hyperbolic #chimerical